Monday, 24 July 2017

The Hermitage

THE BARONS MASSY WERE THE GREATEST LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY LEITRIM, WITH 24,571 ACRES

The first of this noble family that settled in Ireland was

GENERAL HUGH MASSY, who had a military command to repress the rebellion of 1641.
General Massy was descended from Hamon de Massey, one of the companions in arms of WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR, who obtained large grants in the counties of Durham and Cheshire, and was created Baron of Dunham Massy.
He wedded Margaret Percy, and had a son,

HUGH MASSY, of Duntrileague, who espoused Amy, daughter of John Benson, and had issue,
HUGH, his heir;
John, of Knockaneevan, County Limerick;
William, of Stoneville, County Limerick;
Charles (Very Rev), Dean of Limerick, ancestor of the Massy Baronets;
Margaret, m William Baker.
The eldest son,

COLONEL HUGH MASSY (1685-1757), of Duntrileague, married Elizabeth, daughter of the Rt Hon George Evans, and had issue,
HUGH, his successor;
George (Ven), Archdeacon of Ardfert;
John, killed in a duel;
Godfrey, in holy orders;
William; 
EYRE, 1st LORD CLARINA;
Charles;
Amy; Elizabeth; Catharine.
Colonel Massy was succeeded by his eldest son,

HUGH MASSY (1700-88), of Duntrileague, who, having represented County Limerick in several parliaments, was raised to the peerage, in 1776, as BARON MASSY, of Duntrileague, County Limerick.

His lordship espoused firstly, Mary, daughter and heir of James Dawson, of Ballinacourty, County Tipperary, and had issue,
HUGH, his successor;
James;
John;
Elizabeth.
He married secondly, Rebecca, daughter of Francis Dunlap, of Antigua, and had three sons and four other daughters, viz.
Francis Hugh;
Eyre;
George;
Margaret; Rebecca Frances; Caroline; Amy.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

HUGH, 2nd Baron (1733-90), who wedded, in 1760, Catherine, eldest daughter and co-heir (with her sister Sarah, Countess of Carrick) of Edward Taylor, of Ballymore, County Limerick, and had issue,
HUGH, his successor;
Edward;
George Eyre;
John;
Catherine; Mary Anne; Jane; Sarah.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

HUGH, 3rd Baron (1761-1812), who married, in 1792, Margaret, youngest daughter of William Barton, of Grove, County Tipperary, and had issue,
HUGH HAMON, his successor;
George William;
John;
Dawson, in holy orders;
Grace Elizabeth; Catherine; Susan Maria; Margaret Everina; Elizabeth Jane Sarah Anne.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

HUGH HAMON, 4th Baron (1793-1836), who wedded, in 1826, Matilda, daughter of LUKE WHITE, of Luttrellstown Castle, County Dublin, and had issue,
HUGH HAMON INGOLDSBY, his successor;
John George Hugh.
The 5th Baron died young; and the 6th Baron, a young man of 19, inherited up to 38,000 acres.

He was said to have an affluent lifestyle with little regard to pecuniary matters.

Grand parties took place at Killakee, and numerous hunting expeditions both there and in Limerick. 

His great-grandson, the 6th Baron, sat in the House of Lords from 1876 to 1915.

As of 2010, the title is held by the latter's great-great-grandson, the 10th Baron, who succeeded his father in 1995.
 

THE HERMITAGE, Castleconnell, County Limerick, was an imposing Georgian house built about 1800 for George Evans Bruce, a disgraced banker.

It was situated in a spectacular location overlooking the Falls of Doonass on the River Shannon.

The Hermitage had a five bay entrance front with a pediment supported by paired huge Corinthian pilasters which framed the centre bay.

There was a balustraded roof parapet.

The garden front consisted of five bays, the end bays having quoins. 

There was a modest, though richly decorated hall with statue niches.

The Hermitage is now demolished.

Seemingly only the foundations now remain of the once beautiful house; broken steps, old kitchen garden walls and the dilapidated fountain all indicating that this was once a very wealthy estate.

During the 18th century, Duntrileague was the seat of the Massys, but in the 19th century their main residence was The Hermitage, close to Limerick city.
In the 1870s Lord Massy owned 8,568 acres in County Limerick and 1,120 acres in County Tipperary; however, his largest estate was in County Leitrim, amounting to over 24,000 acres in 1878.
The Massy family had property in north County Leitrim following the bequest of the White estate at Lareen to John, 6th Lord Massy.

In the 1830s, the Massy estate also comprised property in the parish of Killora, County Galway, where the agent was George Falkner.

This property seems to have been leased by Richard Rathbourne, of Ballymore.

It was offered for sale in the Encumbered Estates court in 1852.

Most of the Massy lands were sold in the last two decades of the 19th century; followed by the family residences in the early years of the 20th century.

There is a good article about the Massy family here.

First published in May, 2011.  Massy arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

1st Duke of Dorset

DUKEDOM OF DORSET
1720-1843

The family of SACKVILLE derived its origin from Herbrand de Sauqueville, who came into England with WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR, and had its principal seat at Buckhurst, in East Sussex.

SIR RICHARD SACKVILLE (c1507-66), Chancellor of the Court of Augmentations in the reign of HENRY VIII, was father of

SIR THOMAS SACKVILLE KG (1536-1608), a celebrated statesman in the reigns of ELIZABETH I and JAMES I.

He was one of the commissioners for the trial of MARY, Queen of Scots; Lord High Steward at the trial of the unfortunate Earl of Essex; Chancellor of Oxford University; and, in 1599, appointed LORD HIGH TREASURER of England.

Sir Thomas married, in 1555, Cicely, daughter of Sir John Baker, of Sissinghurst, Kent, and had issue,
ROBERT, his successor;
Henry;
William
Thomas;
Anne; Jane; Mary.
He was elevated to the peerage, in 1604, as Earl of Dorset.

His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

ROBERT, 2nd Earl (1561-1609), who wedded, in 1580, Margaret, only surviving daughter of Thomas, 4th Duke of Norfolk, and had issue,
RICHARD, his successor;
EDWARD, 4th Earl;
Cecily; Anne.
His lordship was succeeded by his elder son,

RICHARD, 3rd Earl (1589-1624), who espoused, ca 1608, the Lady Anne Clifford, and had issue, five children of whom the two daughters survived; though the family honours devolved upon his brother,

EDWARD, 4th Earl, KG (1591-1652), who married, in 1612, Mary, daughter and heir of Sir George Curzon, of Croxall Hall, Derbyshire, and had issue,
RICHARD, his successor;
Edward;
Mary.
His lordship was succeeded by his elder son,

RICHARD, 5th Earl (1622-77), who wedded, in 1637, the Lady Frances Cranfield, only daughter of Lionel, 1st Earl of Middlesex, and had issue, six daughters and seven sons, of whom the eldest,

CHARLES, 6th Earl, KG (1643-1706), married thrice; and by his second wife, the Lady Mary Compton, only daughter of James, 3rd Earl of Northampton, he had issue,
LIONEL CRANFIELD, his successor;
Mary.
his lordship was succeeded by his son,

LIONEL CRANFIELD, 7th Earl, KG (1688-1765), who espoused, in 1709, Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of Lieutenant-General Walter Colyear, and had issue,
CHARLES, his successor;
John, father of JOHN FREDERICK, 3rd Duke;
GEORGE, 5th Duke;
Anne; Elizabeth; Caroline.
His lordship was advanced to the dignity of a dukedom, in 1720, as DUKE OF DORSET.

His Grace was succeeded by his eldest son,

CHARLES, 2nd Duke (1711-69), who married, in 1744, daughter and heir of Richard, 2nd Viscount Shannon, though the marriage was without issue, and the family honours reverted to His Grace's nephew,

JOHN FREDERICK, 3rd Duke, KG (1745-99), who wedded, in 1790, Arabella Diana, eldest daughter and co-heir of Sir Charles Cope Bt, and had issue,
GEORGE JOHN FREDERICK, his successor;
Mary; Elizabeth.
His Grace was succeeded by his son,

GEORGE JOHN FREDERICK, 4th Duke (1793-1815), who died unmarried, when the titles reverted to his cousin,

CHARLES, 5th Duke, KG (1767-1843), third son of the 1st Duke.

His Grace died a bachelor, when the dukedom and the other titles expired.

Former seats ~ Knole Park, Sevenoaks, Kent; Buckhurst Park, Withyham, East Sussex; Croxall Hall, Staffordshire.

Former town residence ~ Dorset House, London.

Dorset arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

Sunday, 23 July 2017

Shaen House

THE KEMMIS FAMILY WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN QUEEN'S COUNTY, WITH 5,800 ACRES

Of the early period of the Kemeys family the accounts are somewhat confused, but it is generally agreed that their origin was Norman.

They rose to prominence at the period of the conquest of Gwent and Glamorgan.

The original form of the name is uncertain, though it is said to be Camois or Camys, identical with Camois in the Roll of Battle Abbey.

They were known as "Kemeys of Began" as early as the 13th century.

The Irish branch claims descent from the ancient family of Kemeys of Newport, Monmouthshire, which family bore as their arms vert on a chevron argent, three pheons sable.

THOMAS KEMMIS (1710-74), of Shaen Castle, Killeen, Straboe, Rossnaclough, and Clonin, Queen's County, wedded Susan, daughter of John Long, of Derrynaseera, and had issue,
JOHN, of Shaen;
James, major-general;
THOMAS, of whom we treat;
Joshua;
William Edward;
Elizabeth.
The third son,

THOMAS KEMMIS JP (1753-1823), of Shaen Castle, crown and treasury solicitor for Ireland, patron of Rosenallis, married, in 1773, Anne, daughter of Henry White, of Dublin, and had issue,
THOMAS, his heir;
Henry;
William;
James;
Richard;
Anne; Mary; Elizabeth.
The eldest son, 

THE REV THOMAS KEMMIS (1774-1827), of Shaen Castle, and Brockley Park, Queen's County, Patron of Rosenallis, married Mary, daughter and heir of Arthur Riley, of Airfield, County Dublin, and had issue,
THOMAS, his heir;
Arthur;
Henry;
Mary.
The eldest son, 

THOMAS KEMMIS JP, (1798-1844), of Shaen Castle and Straboe, Patron of Rosenallis, High Sheriff, 1832, married, in 1834, Mary Henrietta, eldest daughter of the Rev Robert Blackwood Jelly, of Portarlington, and had issue,
THOMAS, his heir;
Robert;
William;
Arthur;
Jane.
Mr Kemmis was succeeded by his eldest son,

THOMAS KEMMIS JP DL (1837-1906), of Shaen, High Sheriff, 1860, who married, in 1858, Victoria Alexandrina, eldest daughter of Hans H Hamilton QC, of 26 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin, and had issue,
THOMAS HENRY, his heir;
Augusta Mary; Helen.
His only son,

THOMAS HENRY KEMMIS JP DL, of Shaen, captain, Royal Fusiliers, born in 1860, wedded, in 1904, Mary Caroline, eldest daughter of Charles Stewart Trench, of Clay Hill, Virginia, USA, and had issue,
WILLIAM FREDERICK, b 1905;
Victoria Mary, b 1908;
Elizabeth Gertrude, b 1911.

SHAEN HOUSE, near Port Laoise, formerly Maryborough, County Laois, is a house of late Georgian appearance.

It comprises two storeys over a basement.


The entrance front has two three-sided bows; pedimented one-bay projection in the centre; Greek Ionic porch with acroterion.


There is a notable castellated gateway at the demesne's main entrance.


Shaen House is now a hospital.

First published in April, 2013.

Saturday, 22 July 2017

Watermill Restaurant

Watermill Lodge

It is always a true pleasure to revisit County Fermanagh.

I was there for four days this week.

The main road from Belfast to Enniskillen is so good now that one can drive for a good part of the way at 70mph; though the Augher-Clogher-Fivemiletown section is at 30mph through the villages.

I stayed in Lisnaskea, the county's second town, I gather.

Belle Isle, the Duke of Abercorn's beautiful County Fermanagh estate and resort, isn't far from Lisnaskea, so I motored over to have a look around and chatted with the staff in the visitor office.

I usually visit the Fermanagh National Trust properties so, having been invited to a private dinner at Crom estate on Wednesday evening, I revisited Crom the next day for a good walk to the old castle, the walled garden on Inisherk Island, and through sections of woodland.

I also visited Florence Court on Wednesday; and Castle Coole, a National Trust property and seat of the Earl of Belmore, many of whose paintings are on display in the mansion house.

Lord and Lady Belmore today live at the Garden House on the estate and their elder son John, Viscount Corry, keeps one of the wings at Castle Coole.

As a matter of interest I counted 28 chimneys on the main block and 14 on Lord Corry's wing.

A highlight of my trip to County Fermanagh was dinner at the Watermill Restaurant at Kilmore Lough, about two miles south-west of Lisnaskea.

Kilmore Lough is navigable from Upper Lough Erne and, indeed, there were lots of cruisers and boats at the quay.


Watermill Lodge is one of the most charming places, with a thatched roof, little ponds, herb gardens, streams, rockeries and more.


Pascal Brissaud's attention to detail is remarkable.

Even the lavatories have curving mosaic tiles and stone spouts, skin to little streams, from which water flows into the hand basins.

Large bellows table

The Lodge is filled with character; the staff, smartly turned out, courteous, charming, diligent.


I sat at a table near the bar.


I perused the menu at length and chose prawn cocktail as a starter; not a common prawn cocktail, though, this one was served in a shell with juicy prawns.

As you'd expect, fresh breads were presented in a basked with hand-carved pats of butter.


The wine menu, by the way, has one of the finest selections in Northern Ireland, including several costing over £2,200 a bottle.

There is, should one require it, a helipad in the grounds (!).


For my main course I had the duck, served with creamed potato, sauce and a garnish (putting it simply).

I ordered a dish of mixed vegetables as well.

My pudding was a Pascal Special: dainty, little profiteroles.


I do not pretend to any kind of restaurant critic, though I thoroughly enjoyed my meal and of course the extraordinary location and ambiance of this restaurant and guest-house.

I hope to base myself here the next time.

Armagh: III

Primate's chapel, Armagh Palace

I paid a visit to the City of Armagh in May, 2013.

Arriving at the main entrance to St Patrick's Roman Catholic Cathedral in the city of Armagh, I strode up the steep hill where, at the summit, there stands augustly and loftily that great cathedral church with its twin spires, seat of many Cardinal Archbishops of Armagh.


There was a wedding taking place inside, so I bided my time by wandering round the cathedral, past Ara Coeli, the official residence of the Catholic Primate.

Ara Coeli is Latin, incidentally.

When the wedding ceremony ended, I walked in to the cathedral, an impressive church dating from about 1840, though not completed until the first years of the 20th century.

Former cardinals' galeros are suspended from the ceiling in the aisles.

Galero

THENCE I ambled on to English Street, past the Charlemont Arms Hotel and, a mere few yards further along, the De Averell guest-house.

Back at The Mall, where I'd parked the two-seater, I stopped to look at the court-house.

The old entrance posts of The Pavilion, erstwhile home of the Lord Armaghdale, still exist.

The Royal Irish Fusiliers Museum, located at the Sovereign's House, was open; so I spent about thirty minutes there.

They have two Victoria Crosses and Field-Marshal Sir Gerald Templer's uniform is on display, as Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment.


I drove to the Palace Demesne, well worth a visit.

I've already written about the Palace, official residence of the Church of Ireland Archbishops of Armagh and Primates of All Ireland from 1770 until 1975.


The archiepiscopal arms of Primate Robinson (later 1st Baron Rokeby) adorn the entrance front, above the porch.

The private primatial chapel is somewhat dwarfed by its close proximity to the Palace, though this wasn't always the case, since the Palace was originally two storeys in height.

These edifices are austere, though stately, noble and dignified; apt descriptions for archiepiscopal properties.

That concluded my visit to the city of Armagh, though I hope to revisit the city and county during the summer.

First published in May, 2013.

Friday, 21 July 2017

Duke of Kent in County Down

The Duke of Kent has paid a two-day visit to County Down.

His Royal Highness visited Downpatrick Police Station, Downpatrick, County Down, and was received by Her Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant of County Down (Mr. David Lindsay).

HRH later visited Down Cathedral, Downpatrick .

His Royal Highness subsequently visited Finnebrogue House, near Downpatrick.

The following day The Duke of Kent officially named the MV Strangford II ferry.

His Royal Highness later visited Castle Ward Estate, County Down; and the Exploris Aquarium, Portaferry, County Down.

Beltrim Castle

Arms of 1st Earl of Abercorn
THE COLE-HAMILTONS WERE MAJOR LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY TYRONE, WITH 16,811 ACRES


THE RT HON SIR CLAUDE HAMILTON (c1576-1614), of Bodoney, County Tyrone, second son of Claude, 1st Lord Paisley, and brother of James, 1st Earl of Abercorn; Gentleman of the Chamber, and Privy Counsellor.

Sir Claude married the daughter and heir of Sir Robert Hamilton, Knight, and died in 1614, leaving with five younger sons, Alexander, Robert, George, Claude, and James, all of whom dsp, and an elder son and heir,

SIR WILLIAM HAMILTON, Knight, of Manor Elieston, County Tyrone, who married twice.

He was buried in Bodoney parish church, Killeter, Castlederg, County Tyrone.

The eldest son of his second marriage, with Beatrix Campbell,

CLAUD HAMILTON, of Montaloney, County Tyrone, had, by Isabella his wife, five daughters, viz. Beatrix, Mary, Agnes, Margaret, and Rebecca; and two sons,
WILLIAM, his successor;
Claud, of Strabane, ancestor of Hamilton Baronets of Woodbrook.
Mr Hamilton was succeeded by his eldest son,

WILLIAM HAMILTON, of Beltrim, County Tyrone, who left, by Mary his wife, two sons and three daughters.

His son,

CLAUD HAMILTON, of Beltrim, married his cousin, Letitia, daughter of Claud Hamilton, of Strabane, and had issue,
LETITIA, of whom hereafter;
Isabella; Beatrix.
Mr Hamilton was succeeded by his elder daughter,

LETITIA HAMILTON, of Beltrim, who espoused, in 1780, the Hon Arthur Cole MP, afterwards COLE-HAMILTON, of Skea, County Fermanagh.

Mr Cole-Hamilton was the second son of John, 1st Baron Mountflorence, and brother of William, 1st Earl of Enniskillen.

Mr Cole-Hamilton left issue,
CLAUD WILLIAM, his heir;
Letitia; Elizabeth Ann; Isabella.
He was succeeded by his eldest son,

CLAUD WILLIAM COLE-HAMILTON (1781-1822), who married, in 1805, Nichola Sophia, daughter of Richard Chaloner, of Kingsfort, County Meath, by whom he left at his decease, two sons,
ARTHUR WILLOUGHBY, his heir;
Richard Chaloner.
Mr Cole-Hamilton was succeeded by his elder son,

MAJOR ARTHUR WILLOUGHBY COLE-HAMILTON JP DL (1806-91), of Beltrim Castle, who married, in 1831, Emilia Katherine, daughter of Rev Charles Cobbe Beresford, and granddaughter of the Hon John Beresford, second son of Marcus, 1st Earl of Tyrone, and brother of George, 1st Marquess of Waterford, and had issue,
WILLIAM CLAUD, his heir;
Claud Chaloner;
Charles Richard, Commander RN;
Arthur Henry (Rev);
John Isaac (father of Air Vice-Marshal John Cole-Hamilton);
Letitia Grace; Emily Harriet; Selina.
Major Cole-Hamilton was succeeded by his eldest son,

CAPTAIN WILLIAM CLAUD COLE-HAMILTON (1833-82), of Ballitore House, County Kildare, who wedded, in 1858, Caroline Elizabeth Josephine, daughter of Hon Andrew Godfrey Stewart, and granddaughter of Andrew Thomas, 1st Earl Castle Stewart; and dvp in 1882, having had, with other issue,
ARTHUR RICHARD, his heir;
William Andrew Thomas;
Claud George;
Isabel Mary.
Captain Cole-Hamilton was succeeded by his eldest son,

COLONEL ARTHUR RICHARD COLE-HAMILTON JP DL (1859-1915), of Beltrim Castle.
Captain,7th Hussars; fought in the Egyptian Campaign, 1882; Captain, Royal Scots Fusiliers; Sudan Campaign, 1885-86; Lieutenant-Colonel, 6th Service Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment; lived at Caddagh, Wilkinstown, County Meath, and Beltrim, Gortin, Newtownstewart, County Tyrone; Lieutenant-Colonel and Honorary Colonel, 6th Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles; 1st World War service, where he was mentioned in despatches; fought in the Gallipoli Campaign.
Colonel Cole-Hamilton married firstly, in 1882, Jeannette, eldest daughter of Samuel Moore, of Moorlands, Lancashire, and had issue, an only child,
WILLIAM MOORE, his heir.
He wedded secondly, in 1884, Florence Alice, daughter of James Duke Hughes, of Brentwood, Surrey.

Colonel Cole-Hamilton died in 1915, aged 56, at The Dardenelles, Turkey, killed in action.

His only son,

MAJOR WILLIAM MOORE COLE-HAMILTON (1883-1948), of Beltrim Castle, Royal Army Service Corps, married, in 1903, Ada Beatrice, daughter of William Peter Huddle, and had an only son,

WILLIAM ARTHUR RICHARD COLE-HAMILTON (1906-36), who married, in 1932, Barbara, daughter of Edward J Deane, and had two daughters,

A memorial screen at Kilwinning Old Parish Church, Ayrshire, was erected from a generous gift made by John Cole-Hamilton and was dedicated on 10th June, 1990.
It was erected in memory of Mr Cole-Hamilton’s father, Colonel Arthur Richard Cole-Hamilton, who died at Gallipoli in 1915; his mother Sarah who died on 18th September, 1942; and his wife Gladys who died on 4th October, 1989. Mr Cole-Hamilton died on 10th November, 1991. The Screen incorporates the Cole-Hamilton shield and the seal of the Abbot of Kilwinning.

BELTRIM CASTLE, near Gortin, County Tyrone, is a five-bay, two-storey, rendered house, built ca 1780-1820.

It is L-shaped, facing west, with a multi-bay, two-storey return.

The formal appearance of the west front to Beltrim Castle owes its existence to early 19th century improvements, which also saw the remains of the 17th century bawn incorporated into a long rear return.

The 19th century house retains most of the original features.

In is said to be not only of local importance, but also of national significance.

Beltrim's associated outbuildings, former bawn, and gardens contribute significantly to the architectural and historic interest of the property.

The only part of the original castle which remains standing is a gable wall which is no part of the present building.

Beltrim is now part of the Blakiston-Houston Estate.

Richard Patrick Blakiston-Houston OBE JP DL was born in 1948; educated at Eton; registered as a Professional Associate, Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, 1972; High Sheriff of County Down, 1989. His wife,

Dr Lucinda Mary Lavinia Blakiston-Houston DL (b 1956), daughter of Lt.-Cdr. Theodore Bernard Peregrine Hubbard and Lady Miriam Fitzalan-Howard; graduated from Leeds University with a Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.); Liverpool University, Master of Science (M.Sc.); Queen's University, Belfast, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.).

Other residence: The Roddens, Ballywalter, County Down.

Interestingly, the Blakiston-Houston family appear to be related to General Sam Houston, after which Houston, Texas, USA, was named. 
Orangefield Park in east Belfast was the family home of the Houston family in the 18th century. The head of the family, John Holmes Houston, was a partner in the Belfast Banking Company and lived at Orangefield House with his family. 

Orangefield was situated at the end of what is now Houston Park and the estate itself extended to almost 300 acres. John and Eliza's daughter, Mary Isabella, was born in 1793 and later married Richard Bayly Blakiston.

The two families joined names, leaving J Blakiston-Houston in charge of the Orangefield estate from 1857.


In 1934, the Blakiston-Houston family offered Belfast Corporation (now the council) part of the Orangefield estate to develop as a public park. The corporation, although keen to buy the land, felt that the price was too high. 

After lengthy negotiations, they bought part of the site in 1938 for £20,000 (£1.1 million in today's values). Development work was put on hold due to World War II and plans for the park were only drawn up in 1947. 
First published in December, 2009.

Thursday, 20 July 2017

1st Duke of Buckingham

DUKEDOM OF BUCKINGHAM AND CHANDOS
1822-1889

The family of GRENVILLE, of Wotton, Buckinghamshire, was a younger branch of the Grenvilles, or Granvilles, of Devon, whose descent from Rollo, 1st Duke of Normandy, is recited and acknowledged in a warrant from CHARLES II to John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath, authorizing him to use the titles of Earl of Corboile, Thorigny, and Granville, which had been borne by his ancestor, Richard de Grenville, who died after 1142.

RICHARD GRENVILLE (1678-1727), of Wotton, married, in 1710, Hester, eldest daughter of Sir Richard Temple Bt, of Stowe, Buckinghamshire, and sister of Richard, Viscount Cobham.

On the death of her said brother, this lady, pursuant to an especial limitation in his patent of creation, became Viscountess Cobham, to her and her heirs male.

Her ladyship was further advanced, in 1749, to the dignity of Countess Temple of Stowe.

The issue of Lady Temple and Richard Grenville were,
RICHARD, her successor;
GEORGE;
William Wyndham;
James;
Henry.
The Countess died in 1752, and was succeeded by her eldest son,

RICHARD, 2nd Earl, KG (1711-79), who wedded Anne, daughter and co-heir of Thomas Chambers, of Hanworth, Middlesex, and had an only child, ELIZABETH, who died in 1742, aged four.

His lordship was succeeded by his nephew,

GEORGE, 3rd Earl, KG, KP (1753-1813), who obtained the royal sign manual, 1779, authorizing him to take the names of NUGENT and TEMPLE before that of GRENVILLE, and to sign the name of Nugent before before all titles of honour.

His lordship was created Marquess of Buckingham in 1784.

He married, in 1775, the Lady Mary Nugent, daughter of the 1st Earl Nugent, and had issue,
RICHARD, his successor;
George;
Mary.
His lordship was succeeded by his elder son,

RICHARD, 2nd Marquess, KG (1776-1839), who wedded, in 1796, the Lady Anne Brydges, daughter of James, 3rd and last Duke of Chandos.

His lordship was created, in 1822, Marquess of Chandos and DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM and CHANDOS.

His Grace was succeeded by his son,

RICHARD, 2nd Duke, KG, GCH (1797-1861), who wedded, in 1819, the Lady Mary, daughter of the 1st Marquess of Breadalbane, and had issue, with a daughter, a son and successor,

RICHARD, 3rd Duke, GCSI (1823-89), who married firstly, in 1851, Caroline, daughter of Robert Harvey, and had issue,
MARY, 11th Lady Kinloss;
Anne; Caroline Jemima.
His Grace espoused secondly, in 1885, Alice, daughter of Sir Graham Graham-Montgomery Bt, though the marriage was without issue.

The titles expired on the decease of the 3rd and last Duke.

Former seat ~ Stowe House, Buckinghamshire.

Buckingham arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

Gowran Castle

THE VISCOUNTS CLIFDEN WERE THE GREATEST LANDOWNERS IN COUNTY KILKENNY, WITH 35,288 ACRES

CHARLES AGAR, of Yorkshire, married Ellis, daughter of Peter Blancheville, of County Kilkenny, and settling at Gowran, in that county, died there in 1696, and was succeeded by his son,

JAMES AGAR, of Gowran Castle, who wedded firstly, in 1692, Susannah, daughter of John Alexander, but by that lady had no issue to survive youth.

He espoused secondly, Mary, eldest daughter of Sir Henry Wemyss, of Danesfort, County Kilkenny, and had issue,
HENRY, his heir;
James;
ELLIS, cr COUNTESS OF BRANDON;
Mary.
The elder son, 

HENRY AGAR, sat in the parliament which assembled at the accession of GEORGE II, in 1727, for the borough of Gowran.

He married, in 1733, Anne, only daughter of the Rt Rev Welbore Ellis, Lord Bishop of Meath, and sister of Welbore Ellis, 1st Lord Mendip, and had issue,
JAMES, his heir;
Welbore Ellis;
CHARLES, Lord Archbishop of Dublin; cr Earl of Normanton;
Henry, in holy orders;
Diana.
Mr Agar died in 1746, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

THE RT HON JAMES AGAR MP (1735-88), of Gowran Castle, who having many years represented County Kilkenny in parliament, and filled some high official situations in Ireland, was created Baron Clifden, in 1776.

He was advanced to the dignity of a viscountcy, in 1781, as VISCOUNT CLIFDEN, of Gowran, County Kilkenny.

His lordship wedded Lucia, eldest daughter of John Martin, and widow of the Hon Henry Boyle Walsingham, second son of Henry, Earl of Shannon, and had issue,
HENRY WELBORE, his successor;
John Ellis, in holy orders;
Charles Bagenal.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,

HENRY WELBORE, 2nd Viscount (1761-1836), who inherited, in 1802, the barony of Mendip, upon the demise of his great-uncle, Welbore, Lord Mendip, and assumed the additional name of ELLIS.

His lordship married, in 1792, the Lady Caroline Spencer, eldest daughter of George, 3rd Duke of Marlborough KG, and had an only son,

GEORGE JAMES WELBORE (1797-1833), who was created, 1831, BARON DOVER.

HENRY,  3rd Viscount Clifden and 3rd Baron Mendip.



GOWRAN CASTLE, County Kilkenny, is an elegantly-appointed, substantial house built for Henry, 2nd Viscount Clifden, to designs attributable to William Robertson (1770-1850), forming an attractive landmark in the centre of Gowran.

Probably incorporating the fabric of an early 18th century house built by James, 1st Viscount Clifden, the present edifice represents the continuation of a long-standing presence on site having origins dating back to at least the late 14th century.

Attributes identifying the architectural design significance of the composition include the balanced configuration of pleasantly-proportioned openings centred on each front on a Classical frontispiece exhibiting expert masonry in locally-sourced Kilkenny limestone.

Although a later range has been lost the essential attributes of the original portion prevail, together with substantial quantities of the historic fabric both to the exterior and to the interior.

Forming a prominent focal point enhancing the townscape of Gowran, the house remains of additional importance in the locality for the connections with the Agar-Ellis and the Moran families.

It was inherited by the daughter of the 3rd Viscount, who married the 3rd Baron Annaly.

Gowran was sold by the 4th Lord Annaly ca 1955.

First published in May, 2011.  Clifden arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

The Bar Hall Acquisition

SELECTIVE ACQUISITIONS IN NORTHERN IRELAND


PROPERTY: Bar Hall Lands, near Portaferry, County Down

DATE: 1986-2003

EXTENT: 104.90 acres

DONOR: Mrs McClelland

First published in February, 2015.

62-68 High Street, Belfast

62-68 High Street, Belfast, is a four-storey painted terracotta and red-brick building with dormers and turrets, by the architect William Batt for The National Bank.

Construction began in 1893 and the building was completed in 1897.

Marcus Patton OBE, in his Central Belfast: A Historical Gazetteer, describes it thus:
Terracotta arabesques of centaurs with cornucopias swirl at the foot of the wineglass stem bases of the two-storey canted oriels rising above the main dentilled cornice to become octagonal turrets with fishscale roofs flanking a central dormer, with smaller dormers on the face of the mansard roof behind.

Built in "a kind of Franco-Flemish Renaissance style" of steel and fire-proof concrete, it originally had an interior of some grandeur, and before it was clad over [1980s], the ground floor had a balcony over the central window, with broken pediments over grand side entrances.

...the strength of the concrete was proved when the building survived the 1941 blitz intact, unlike most of its neighbours.
The National Bank operated from the building until absorption by the Bank of Ireland in 1966.

In June, 2013, a project began to redevelop the ground floor for use as a a café bar: The National Grande Café Bar, which opened in early September, 2013.

In the spring of 2015 a cocktail bar and nightclub, called Sixty6, opened on the upper floors of the building.


The National Bank of Ireland was founded in London in 1835, becoming The National Bank Ltd in 1859.

The bank's core Irish business was divested to the Governor and Company of the Bank of Ireland, as National Bank of Ireland, in 1966.
First published in July, 2013. 

Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Armagh: II

Inside Armagh (Anglican) Cathedral, the staff pointed out the stained-glass window over the West Door, which contains the armorial bearings of principal donors during the great 1834 restoration of the building, viz.
1st Earl O'Neill KP PC; Sir Thomas Molyneux Bt; Samuel Blacker; Maxwell Close; James Wood; Elias Elsler; Thomas Keers; Roger Hall; R Livingstone; and Sir William Verner Bt MP.
Could Lord O'Neill's act of beneficence have been a form of atonement?

In 1566, Shane O'Neill ‘utterly destroyed the Cathedral by fire, lest the English should again lodge in it’.

In 1641 it again became a target for the O'Neills, when Sir Phelim O'Neill burned it.

I was made aware of an anomaly in the North-west Window, viz. an anatomical error in the glass, whereby the right leg of the boy in the central light terminates in a left foot.

From the Cathedral, I walked the very short distance ~ about one minute ~ to a little museum, Number 5 Vicars' Hill.
Vicars' Hill is a terrace of houses formerly occupied by cathedral choir-men and clergy widows. Numbers 1-4 were built by Archbishop Boulter in 1724; the rest were constructed by Archbishop Robinson.

5 Vicars’ Hill was built in 1772 as the Diocesan Registry to hold records for the Church of Ireland and Armagh diocese, its octagonal rooms contained many public as well as Church records.

While the diocesan records are no longer retained in the building, some examples are on display, with ancient coins, gems, significant prints, early Christian artefacts and other collections and curiosities from Armagh Public Library.

The deceptively large building, which resembles a modest dwelling from the outside, has a fascinating interior and retains many of its original features.
I enjoyed a lengthy chat with the curator, reminiscing about such Primates as Archbishop Simms, the last prelate to reside at Armagh Palace.

Rather conveniently, when the museum closed at 1pm, I walked next door to number 4, a charming little restaurant and tearoom called One Eighty on the Hill.

On perusal of the menu, I opted for the smoked salmon Caesar salad and a pot of tea.

The young staff here were lovely ~ most attentive and courteous.

Whilst waiting, the noble eye found itself gazing upwards, to the quirky crockery light fitting.


My salad was very good.

The tea arrived in an enormous pot, which must have held about two pints.

I actually had trouble lifting it with one hand, having to support the weight by placing a few fingers on the spout!

Having spent a delightful forty minutes at One Eighty on the Hill, I ventured out into the sunshine and ambled down the hill, past Church House and the Library.

Armagh Public Library, the oldest library in Northern Ireland, was founded in 1771 by Primate Robinson as part of his plans to establish a university and to improve Armagh City.

The 1773 ‘Act for settling and preserving the Publick Library in Armagh for ever’ established the Library and its name.

First published in May, 2013.

1st Duke of Leeds

DUKEDOM OF LEEDS
1694-1964

This noble family, like many others in the peerage, traces its origin to the city of London, where it first became of importance through

SIR EDWARD OSBORNE, Knight (c1530-91), who filled the office of Lord Mayor in 1582.

This gentleman discovering an early bias towards commercial pursuits, was put apprentice to Sir William Hewett, of the Clothworkers' Company, one of the most considerable merchants in London; and while serving his apprenticeship, Sir William's only child Anna, having accidentally fallen from the window of his house on London Bridge, into the Thames, Mr Osborne leaped into the river and brought her out in safety, when but little hope remained of her rescue.

This lady was afterwards his wife, and by her he had issue,
HEWETT, his heir;
Edward;
Anne; Alice; Jane.
Sir Edward married secondly, Margaret, who outlived him.

He was MP for the City of London, 1585.

Sir Edward was succeeded by his eldest son,

SIR HEWETT OSBORNE, who received the honour of knighthood from the Earl of Essex, in Ireland, for his services there.

He wedded Joice, daughter of Thomas Fleetwood, of The Vache, Buckinghamshire, Master of the Mint, and had, with a daughter, Alice, an only son, his successor in 1614,

SIR EDWARD OSBORNE, Knight (1596-1647), of Kiveton, Yorkshire, who was created a baronet, 1620.

In 1629, when Thomas, Viscount Wentworth (afterwards Earl of Strafford), was made Lord President of the North, Sir Edward Osborne was appointed Vice-President of the Council to CHARLES I for the North of England; and upon the breaking out of the rebellion, 1641, was Lieutenant-General of the forces raised in His Majesty's defence in that part of the country.

He wedded firstly, Margaret, eldest daughter of Thomas, Viscount Fauconberg, and had a son, Edward, who was killed in youth by the fall of some chimneys at his father's residence.

Sir Edward espoused secondly, Anne, daughter of Thomas Walmesley, of Lancashire, and by this lady he had an only son, his successor,

SIR THOMAS OSBORNE, 2nd Baronet (1632-1712), who became Lord High Treasurer of England and was elevated to the peerage, 1673, as Viscount Osborne and Earl of Danby.

His lordship was advanced to the dignity of a marquessate, in 1689, as Marquess of Carmarthen; and further advanced, in 1694, to a dukedom, as DUKE OF LEEDS.

He was installed a Knight of the Garter, and enrolled amongst the peers of Scotland, 1675, by the title of Viscount Osborne, of Dunblane.

His Grace married Bridget, daughter of Montagu Bertie, 2nd Earl of Lindsey, LORD GREAT CHAMBERLAIN OF ENGLAND, and was succeeded at his demise, in 1712, by his only surviving son,

PEREGRINE, 2nd Duke (1659-1729), who wedded Bridget, only daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Hyde Bt, by whom he had two sons and two daughters.

His Grace having adopted the naval profession, attained the rank of Vice-Admiral of the Red, 1705, and conveyed the Duke of Marlborough and his army, with six men-of-war, to Holland in the same year.

He was succeeded by his second and only surviving son,

PEREGRINE HYDE, 3rd Duke (1691-1731), who espoused firstly, Elizabeth, daughter of Robert, Earl of Oxford, by whom he had an only son, THOMAS, his successor; and secondly, Anne, daughter of Charles, Duke of Somerset, by whom he had no surviving issue.

His Grace married thirdly, in 1725, Juliana, daughter and co-heir of Roger Hele, of Holwell, Devon.

The 3rd Duke was succeeded by his son,

THOMAS, 4th Duke, KG (1713-89), who wedded, in 1740, Mary, second daughter and eventually sole heir of Francis, Earl of Godolphin, and was succeeded by his only surviving son,

FRANCIS GODOLPHIN, 5th Duke (1751-99), who wedded, in 1773, Amelia, only daughter and heir of Robert D'Arcy, Earl of Holderness, and Baroness Conyers, at the demise of her father, by which marriage he had issue,
GEORGE WILLIAM FREDERICK, his successor;
Francis Godolphin, created 1st BARON GODOLPHIN;
Mary Henrietta Juliana.
This marriage being dissolved by act of Parliament in 1779, His Grace espoused secondly, in 1788, Catherine, daughter of Thomas Anguish, Accountant-General of the Court of Chancery, and had issue,
Sidney Godolphin;
Catherime Anne Sarah.
His Grace was succeeded by his eldest son,

GEORGE WILLIAM FREDERICK, 6th Duke, KG (1775-1838), who inherited the barony of Conyers upon the decease of his mother Amelia, Baroness Conyers in her own right, in 1784.

His Grace espoused, in 1797, Charlotte, daughter of George, 1st Marquess Townshend, and had issue,
FRANCIS GODOLPHIN D'ARCY, his successor;
Conyers George Thomas William;
Charlotte Mary Anne Georgiana.
The 6th Duke was Lord-Lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire, Governor of the Scilly Isles, Constable of Middleton Castle, and Ranger of Richmond Forest.

He was appointed Master of the Horse, 1827, sworn of the Privy Council, and appointed a Knight of the Garter on the same day.

At the coronation of WILLIAM IV, the Duke of Leeds was one of the four Knights of the Garter who held over the King's head the pall of gold at the ceremony of anointing.

His Grace was succeeded by his only surviving son,

FRANCIS GODOLPHIN D'ARCY, 7th Duke, who married, in 1828, Louisa Catharine, third daughter and co-heir of Richard Caton, of Maryland, USA, though the marriage was without issue, and the titles devolved upon His Grace's cousin,

GEORGE GODOLPHIN, 2nd Baron Godolphin, 8th Duke (1802-72), who wedded, in 1824, Harriet Emma Arundel, natural daughter of Granville, 1st Earl Granville,
Francis George Godolphin D'Arcy D'Arcy-Osborne, 7th Duke (1798–1859);
George Godolphin Osborne, 8th Duke (1802–72);
George Godolphin Osborne, 9th Duke (1828–95);
George Godolphin Osborne, 10th Duke (1862–1927);
John Francis Godolphin Osborne, 11th Duke (1901–1963);
Francis D'Arcy Godolphin Osborne, 12th Duke (1884–1964), grandson of Lord Godolphin's third son, died without issue, at which point all of his titles became extinct.
Former seats ~ Hornby Castle, Yorkshire; Godolphin, Cornwall.

Leeds arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

Monday, 17 July 2017

Palmerstown House

THE EARLS OF MAYO OWNED 4,915 ACRES OF LAND IN COUNTY KILDARE

This is a branch of the noble and illustrious house of CLANRICARDE, said to derive from the old Bourkes, Viscounts Mayo, whose representation vested in AYLMER BOURKE LAMBERT, of Boyton, Wiltshire, vice-president of the Linnean society.

JOHN BOURKE (third son of David Bourke, of Moneycrower, County Mayo) was a captain of horse under the Marquess of Ormonde during the troubles in Ireland, in 1641; at the termination of which he took up his abode at Kill, County Kildare, and marrying Catherine, daughter of Meyler Fay, and niece of Sir Paul Davys, had (with three daughters),
Miles, dsp;
Walter, dsp;
Theobald, dsp;
RICKARD, of whom presently
The youngest son,

RICKARD BOURKE, married Catherine, daughter of Charles Minchin, of Ballinakill, County Tipperary, and was father of

THE RT HON JOHN BOURKE (c1705-90), MP for Naas, who wedded, in 1725, Mary, third daughter and co-heir of the Rt Hon Joseph Deane, Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer, and had issue,
JOHN, his heir;
JOSEPH DEANE (Most Rev), Lord Archbishop of Tuam, 3rd Earl;
Richard;
Thomas;
Catherine; Elizabeth; Margaret; Eleanor.
Mr Bourke having been sworn previously of the Irish privy council, was elevated to the peerage, in 1776, as Baron Naas; and advanced to a viscountcy, 1781, as Viscount Mayo.

His lordship was further advanced to the dignity of an earldom, in 1785, as EARL OF MAYO.

The 1st Earl was succeeded by his eldest son,

JOHN, 2nd Earl (1729-92), who espoused, in 1764, the Lady Mary Leeson, daughter of Joseph, Earl of Milltown, but died without issue, when the honours devolved upon his brother,


JOSEPH DEANE (Most Rev), Lord Archbishop of Tuam, as 3rd Earl (c1740-94), who married, in 1760, Elizabeth, only daughter of Sir Richard Meade Bt, and sister of John, 1st Earl of Clanwilliam, by whom he had issue,
JOHN, 4th Earl;
Richard (Rt Rev), Lord Bishop of Waterford;
Joseph (Very Rev), Dean of Ossory;
George Theobald (Rev);
and eight daughters.
His lordship was succeeded by his eldest son,
John, 4th Earl (1766–1849);
Robert, 5th Earl (1797–1867);
Richard Southwell, 6th Earl (1822-72);
Dermot Robert Wyndham, 7th Earl (1851–1927);
Walter Longley, 8th Earl (1859–1939);
Ulick Henry, 9th Earl (1890–1962);
Terence Patrick, 10th Earl (1929–2006);
Charles Diarmuidh John, 11th Earl (b 1953).
The heir apparent is the present holder's eldest son, Richard Thomas Bourke, styled Lord Naas (b 1985).


PALMERSTOWN HOUSE, near Johnstown, County Kildare, is a mansion-house rebuilt in late-Victorian "Queen Anne" style.

6th Earl of Mayo KP GCSI PC
The mansion was built by public subscription as a tribute to the memory of the 6th Earl of Mayo, Chief Secretary for Ireland and later Viceroy of India.
The 6th Earl was assassinated by an escaped convict in the Andaman Islands in 1872.
One front has a recessed centre and three-bay projections, joined by a colonnade of coupled columns. Another front has a pediment elevated on a three-bay attic, between two three-sided bows.

The house has a Mansard roof with pedimented dormers.


The mansion was burnt in 1923, though afterwards rebuilt with a flat roof and balustraded parapet.

Palmerstown has had a succession of owners, including Mrs B Lawlor, who began her career as cook to the 7th Earl and Countess.

Palmerstown House now functions as a de luxe golf golf resort and functions including christenings, communions, confirmations, family celebrations, retirement parties, anniversaries, corporate events, team-building exercises etc.

Mayo arms courtesy of European Heraldry.

The Duchess of Cornwall

Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall GCVO PC is 70 today.

HRH's full style and titles are as follows:
Her Royal Highness The Princess Charles Philip Arthur George, Princess of Wales and Countess of Chester, Duchess of Cornwall, Duchess of Rothesay, Countess of Carrick, Baroness of Renfrew, Lady of the Isles, Princess of Scotland.

In 2007, HRH was appointed to The Royal Family Order of Queen Elizabeth II.

In 2012, Her Royal Highness was appointed Dame Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order (GCVO), as illustrated on HRH's armorial bearings.

In 2016, HRH was appointed a Privy Counsellor.